Sufism-inspired-writings-of-Persian-poet-and-mystic-Jalal-ad-Din-Muhammad-ar-Rumi;-these-writings-express-the-longing-of-the-soul-for-union-with-the-divine.

Jalāl-ad-Dīn-Muhammad-Rūmī—also-known-as-Jalāl-ad-Dīn-Muhammad-Balkhī,-Mevlânâ/Mawlānā-(مولانا,-“our-master”),-Mevlevî/Mawlawī-(مولوی,-“my-master”)-and-more-popularly-simply-as-Rumi—was-a-13th-century-Persian-poet,-jurist,-Islamic-scholar,-theologian-and-Sufi-mystic-who-lived-in-Konya,-a-city-of-Ottoman-Empire-(Today’s-Turkey).-His-poems-have-been-widely-translated-into-many-of-the-world’s-languages,-and-he-has-been-described-as-the-most-popular-poet-and-the-best-selling-poet-in-the-United-States.

His-poetry-has-influenced-Persian-literature,-but-also-Turkish,-Ottoman-Turkish,-Azerbaijani,-Punjabi,-Hindi,-and-Urdu,-as-well-as-the-literature-of-some-other-Turkic,-Iranian,-and-Indo-Aryan-languages-including-Chagatai,-Pashto,-and-Bengali.

Due-to-quarrels-between-different-dynasties-in-Khorāṣān,-opposition-to-the-Khwarizmid-Shahs-who-were-considered-devious-by-his-father,-Bahā-ud-Dīn-Wālad-or-fear-of-the-impending-Mongol-cataclysm,-his-father-decided-to-migrate-westwards,-eventually-settling-in-the-Anatolian-city-Konya,-where-he-lived-most-of-his-life,-composed-one-of-the-crowning-glories-of-Persian-literature,-and-profoundly-affected-the-culture-of-the-area.

When-his-father-died,-Rumi,-aged-25,-inherited-his-position-as-the-head-of-an-Islamic-school.-One-of-Baha’-ud-Din’s-students,-Sayyed-Burhan-ud-Din-Muhaqqiq-Termazi,-continued-to-train-Rumi-in-the-Shariah-as-well-as-the-Tariqa,-especially-that-of-Rumi’s-father.-For-nine-years,-Rumi-practised-Sufism-as-a-disciple-of-Burhan-ud-Din-until-the-latter-died-in-1240-or-1241.-Rumi’s-public-life-then-began:-he-became-an-Islamic-Jurist,-issuing-fatwas-and-giving-sermons-in-the-mosques-of-Konya.-He-also-served-as-a-Molvi-(Islamic-teacher)-and-taught-his-adherents-in-the-madrassa.-During-this-period,-Rumi-also-travelled-to-Damascus-and-is-said-to-have-spent-four-years-there.

It-was-his-meeting-with-the-dervish-Shams-e-Tabrizi-on-15-November-1244-that-completely-changed-his-life.-From-an-accomplished-teacher-and-jurist,-Rumi-was-transformed-into-an-ascetic.

On-the-night-of-5-December-1248,-as-Rumi-and-Shams-were-talking,-Shams-was-called-to-the-back-door.-He-went-out,-never-to-be-seen-again.-Rumi’s-love-for,-and-his-bereavement-at-the-death-of,-Shams-found-their-expression-in-an-outpouring-of-lyric-poems,-Divan-e-Shams-e-Tabrizi.-He-himself-went-out-searching-for-Shams-and-journeyed-again-to-Damascus.

Rumi-found-another-companion-in-Salaḥ-ud-Din-e-Zarkub,-a-goldsmith.-After-Salah-ud-Din’s-death,-Rumi’s-scribe-and-favourite-student,-Hussam-e-Chalabi,-assumed-the-role-of-Rumi’s-companion.-Hussam-implored-Rumi-to-write-more.-Rumi-spent-the-next-12-years-of-his-life-in-Anatolia-dictating-the-six-volumes-of-this-masterwork,-the-Masnavi,-to-Hussam.

In-December-1273,-Rumi-fell-ill-and-died-on-the-17th-of-December-in-Konya.-